Milton

 

Milton

(2011 census population 84,362) is a town in Southern Ontario, Canada, and part of the Halton Region in the Greater Toronto Area. Milton received a tremendous amount of awareness following the release of the results of the 2006 Census, which indicated that Milton is the fastest growing municipality in the Greater Golden Horseshoe, with a 71.4% increase in population between 2001 and 2006.[3] In early 2012, the town’s planner estimated Milton’s population to be between 94,000 and 95,000.[4]

The town is located 40 km (25 mi) west of Downtown Toronto on Highway 401, and is the western terminus for the Milton line commuter train and bus corridor operated by GO Transit. Milton is on the edge of Niagara Escarpment, a UNESCO world biosphere reserve and the Bruce Trail. The town also boasts one of the highest household incomes in the GTA.

History

The town took root out of a settlement by Jasper Martin along the Sixteen Mile Creek; Martin immigrated from Newcastle, England with his wife Sarah and two sons on May 17, 1818. Martin was granted 100 acres (40 ha) of land, from the Crown in 1820, designated Lot 14, Concession 2, Township of Trafalgar, Halton County, in the District of Gore. Martin later built a grist mill along the creek and created a pond, known as Mill Pond, to power his mill. The mill became the center of settlement for others as they settled in the region. In 1837 the area had a population of approximately 100 people and was named Mill Town. The town, as it is today, soon after became known as Milton. The two principal property owners of the young town were the Martins and the Fosters. The current site of Milton’s town hall was donated from Mr. Hugh Foster (and thus, Hugh Foster Hall).[5]

Milton was incorporated into a town in 1857, after being chosen as county seat for Halton. In 1974, the present municipal structure was created when the Regional Municipality of Halton replaced Halton County. The new town of Milton added parts of the former township of Esquesing (most of this township comprises Halton Hills), all of Nassagaweya Township including the village of Campbellville, and the northern sections of Trafalgar and Nelson from (a 1962 annexation of the former townships) Oakville and Burlington respectively.

Demographics

 

According to the Canada 2011 Census there were 84,362 people living in Milton, and its population in 2006 was 53,939, representing an increase of 56.5%. The 2011 Census counted 28,049 housing units and 27,561 being occupied.

  • The average population density per square kilometre was 85.9 persons.
  • Age distribution indicated 26.4% of the population was 19 and younger, 63.1% of the population ages 20–64 and 10.5% 65 and older.
  • The median income for a household in the town was $39,795.
  • The average household income for a family with two earners was $91,384.
  • With one earner in a family, $56,043.
  • Males had an average income of $40,069 versus $35,897 for females.
  • 27.1% of the population had completed high school. 11.4% a Trades certificate or diploma. 24.9% College. 23.0% University.
  • 15.7% of the population had not completed high school.
  • The linguistic makeup of the town was English as a mother tongue for 89.7% of the population.

French as a mother tongue for 1.2% of the population and 0.4% of the population English and French. 8.7% of the populations mother tongue was a language other than French and or English.

  • 90.8% of the population could speak English only, 0.0% of the town could speak French only and 4.8% of the population could speak English and French. 0.3% of the population could not speak English or French.
  • 3.3% of the population consisted of visible minorities, but around 80% of new residents arriving after 2006 are visible minorities.

With the addition of the Niagara Escarpment lands, tourism, recreation, and heritage conservation have increased in importance. The Halton Region Museum which has a large number of historic agricultural buildings and the Halton County Radial Railway museum are located in Milton, as is Country Heritage Park (formerly the Ontario Agricultural Museum). Five large parks operated by Conservation Halton reside in the town and Mohawk Raceway is located near Campbellville. It is also home to Maplehurst Correctional Complex and the Vanier Centre for Women.